Author: Angela Chong

Angela studied Culinary Art & Food Service Management and had lived in the United States for several years. She has traveled to several countries and experienced their unique cultures of food and life. Having grown up with a passion for food she seeks to try any specialty food wherever she goes. You can learn more about her journey on her website.

People all over the world observe a moon festival during the autumn, during which the fullest moon of the year appears and there is a major harvesting time for farmers. Ancient Chinese people worshipped the full moon as thanks for an abundant autumn harvest. Today, the holiday is still observed as a time to reunite with family and engage in exciting festivities like dragon dances, eat mooncake, and light lanterns. These activities are all tied together through their shared moon symbolism. What is Mid-Autumn Festival? Chinese lanterns in fortuitous colours and bearing lucky characters like ‘blessing’ at a Mid-Autumn Festival…

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Mid-Autumn Festival, which occurs on the fifteenth day of the eighth lunar month, is a time for families to gather and appreciate the full harvest moon with dragon dances, lantern lighting, and gift exchanging. Mooncake is an essential part of the festival, so much so that the festival is colloquially known as the Mooncake Festival. During the month leading up to Mid-Autumn Festival (which falls on 10 September 2022 this year), shops all over Hong Kong sell mooncakes with their own styles, recipes, and branding in preparation for large family gatherings where the lucky pastry, in sweet and savoury forms,…

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Like many cultures around the world, Chinese people observe important customs surrounding the dead and their spirits. In Hong Kong and China, as well as other East Asian countries influenced by Chinese beliefs, it is believed that unsettled ghosts leave their spiritual realm in the seventh lunar month to visit the living. During this so-called Ghost Month in Hong Kong, there is a main festival day called Hungry Ghost Festival. What is Hungry Ghost Festival? People praying at a Taiwan temple during Ghost Month (© Tai-Jan Huang via Flickr) Hungry Ghost Festival (盂蘭節, pronounced yu lan jit in Cantonese and…

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The Dragon Boat Festival is a traditional festival with the central themes of warding off evil spirits and keeping diseases, pests, and drought away. Today, dragon boat racing is a sport that people all over the world participate in, but the origins and other traditional practices related to the festival are less known. Its history is rooted in the stories of 2 significant Chinese figures: Qu Yuan (屈原) and Wu Zixu (伍子胥). The date of this traditional public holiday varies on the Gregorian calendar. What is Dragon Boat Festival? Large crowds gather at rivers for dragon boat races (© Tony…

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Yum cha, literally meaning “drink tea”, comes from the traditional Chinese enjoyment of tea with dim sum, which are small, usually steamed dishes. Dim sum is popular in Hong Kong, Macau, Guangdong province, and the Chinese community at large. Yum cha originated in Guangzhou as a way for travellers to enjoy a quick meal of two or so dishes with tea. Here are some great dim sum dishes you must order at a cha lau, or tea house, in Hong Kong. Shrimp dumplings (蝦餃) Plump shrimp dumplings (© Michelin Guide) Shrimp dumplings translates to har gow in Cantonese. The fillings…

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Breakfast is an essential meal to start the day, and having a freshly brewed cup of coffee with your favourite Western breakfast is a great way to do it. From the classics of eggs, sausages, bacon, and toast smeared with jam, to crowd favourites of eggs benedict and fluffy pancakes glistening with butter, a hearty meal to nourish that early morning craving is a great satisfaction. Here are 12 restaurants in Hong Kong that serve some of the best eggs, toast, and potatoes in all forms in town. Sensory Zero Sensory Zero’s all day breakfast set (© OpenRice) If you…

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In a city infused with international food culture, Western bakeries in Hong Kong are platforms to share the art of European-style desserts and pastries. These baked products such as expertly proofed, crackling breads, delicate elegant cakes, and twists on the characteristics of Hong Kong’s local favourites are a creative, artistic collection of flavors, textures, and aromas. Discover your next go-to places for indulgent sweet tooth snacks, exquisite celebration desserts, or a delight to simply enjoy in the afternoon. Bakehouse Bakehouse in Soho’s display of classic French pastries (© U Lifestyle) Grégoire Michaud, an award-winning Swiss pastry chef, opened Bakehouse to…

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Hong Kong’s food culture shows a mixture of influences from around the world. Indeed, the city is known as the “pearl of the East” for its eastern Chinese and western British cultural origins. This creates a diverse background of culinary creations. Here, we highlight this background in the baking arts. These ten classic pastries allow you to take a glimpse of true Hong Kong specialties. Hong Kong has been recognized as a gastronomical hub worldwide from its colonial period until now. These unique pastries are a special representation of the traditional, modern, creative and rich aspects of our foodie scene…

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Cha chaan tengs (茶餐廳) are Cantonese cafés that are key to Hong Kong food culture. They are frequently visited by locals for any of the three meals of the day. You can order special dishes daily from the menu on the walls or blackboards, or enjoy staple beverages, snacks, afternoon tea, or proper meals found in these social hubs all over the city. They are also the birthplace of unique drinks with ingredient combinations boasting skin benefits, a remedy for the common cold, or simply delicious flavours borne of Hong Kong’s multicultural history and here is our guide to specialty…

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The Hong Kong tram, funny as it may sound, is known as the “ding ding” because of the sound it makes to alert pedestrians. The tram has been and still is a supportive transportation system that’s also a significant icon of Hong Kong history. It is the only transportation that captures the character of old Hong Kong in time and has lasted until now. This is the only tram system in the world that exclusively uses double-decker cars. It has been a classic local representation of Hong Kong for over 100 years and since then, has attracted people from all…

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